66 Books (That Everybody Needs To Read)

There are 66 books that everybody needs to read.  These books were written by more than 40 diverse authors — rich people and poor people, intellectuals and uneducated folks.   These 66 books were written over a 1,500 year time period.  Some of these books are poetry; some are history; some are letters; some are biography, some are exhortations.

An amazing thing about these 66 books is that in the 4th Century AD they were brought together as a unit.  As diverse as they are, they fit together so well that for centuries they have been considered to be one book. 

These 66 books have the power to radically transform human lives.  Through out history millions of people have testified to the fact that reading these books lifted their heart, their thinking, and their life to amazing new levels.  

When I first began to read these books 41 years ago, they began to change me at the depths of my being.   I seldom find a book that I will reread.  Not so with these 66 books — I’ve read them over and over and over — and they still burn in my heart, challenge me, and inspire me to be a better man.

An amazing thing about these books is that they are brutally honest — they call a spade a spade.  Most history books put a spin on history and make the heroes look superhuman.  For example, American history books make George Washington and Thomas Jefferson look almost godlike.  They fail to tell the details of their terrible cruelty to their fellow humans — how they forcibly held innocent men, women, and children in bondage, made them work without pay, whipped them if they disobeyed, and wouldn’t let them read any of the 66 books (or even learn to read for that matter).

However, the 66 books are just the opposite.  Unlike distorted history books written by human beings, these 66 books reveal the bad things about their heroes, in shocking and vivid detail.

Bound together, these 66 books are the number one best seller in human history.  The best selling English translation of these books was first translated 500 years ago this year and is known as the KJV.  Through the KJV (and other translations) these books have been the greatest literary influence on Western culture and thought.

Everybody should read these books.  It would be a shame to die having missed out on the best books ever written. 

If I had to pick a favorite of the 66 books, I think I would pick Acts, with Matthew, James, and John right behind.  My least favorite is probably Leviticus.  However, they have all impacted me powerfully.  They are a mirror — they reveal my heart and call me to come clean of my wrongful thoughts and deeds.  They challenge me to be totally honest, to love and serve people, and to live right.

Why not give the 66 books a chance?  Why not read one of them today?

About Steve Simms

I like to look and think outside the box. I have written two books: Mindrobics: How To Be Happy For The Rest Of Your Life and Your Sperm Won--Experiencing Your Value As A Championship Human Being. In college I encountered Jesus Christ and I have been passionate about trying to get to know Him better ever since. My wife and I lead a non-traditional church in Nashville based on open participation and Spirit-led sharing. We long to see the power and passion of the early church come to life in our time.
This entry was posted in Acts, American, American Literature, Bible, books, Christian history, Christianity, church history, criticism, English, English literature, history, kingdom of God, Leviticus, life, lifestyles, meaning, morality, morals, poem, poetry, popular culture, reading, recovery, self-help, thinking, thoughts, Uncategorized, values, words and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to 66 Books (That Everybody Needs To Read)

  1. Pingback: How The Living God Actively Intervenes In My Life | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  2. Pingback: Top Ten Greatest Books | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  3. Pingback: Respecting The Human Right To Disagree And/Or Disapprove | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  4. Pingback: Are Your Selfish Desires Evil? | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  5. Pingback: The “Forgive Yourself” Myth | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  6. Pingback: When People Say “God” Which God Do They Mean? | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  7. Pingback: Have You Played The God Card (Or Is It Still In Your Hand)? | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  8. Pingback: From Hinduism to Jesus Christ | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  9. Pingback: Are You Tired Of Watching Crap In Movies & On TV? | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  10. Pingback: Aiming For Your Heart | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  11. Pingback: “I’ll Fight” — How To Be A Spiritual Soldier | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  12. Pingback: My Soul Needs Fracking (Frack Me, Lord.) | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  13. Pingback: Abraham, Martin, And Barack’s Oath On A Stack Of Bibles | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s