Accepting Black History Into American History

Some people say that we shouldn’t talk about black history in the USA, just American history.  That is a worthy goal — a color blind history where all people are equal. 

The only problem is that when we honestly look back at America’s past, skin color was a really big deal.  People with lighter skins were favored by government and institutions, even by the Constitution.  People with darker skins were considered to be less than human, had no legal rights, and could be legally abused and forcibly held in life long bondage even though they had committed no crime.

The legacy of this history of great inequality still affects the psyche of Americans in spite of our attempts to ignore it and pretend it never happened.  Perhaps, it is time to accept black history into American history and as Paul Harvey used to say, teach and tell “the rest of the story.”  After all, the whole story of America, the experience of whites, blacks, Native Americans and other racial groups is the one history of our country.

Perhaps it is time for all Americans to know the details about the abolitionist movement to end slavery; the underground railroad; the courageous slave rebellions; the black codes; the black US senators and congressmen during reconstruction; the regular rape of slave women, the selling of human beings as personal property; the daily life of Americans held as slaves; the laws against black education and Bible reading, worship, and marriage.

O, so much is left our of our American history books.  Every American should read the slave narratives, Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Mark Twain’s Puddin’ Head Wilson,  Frederic Douglas’ autobiography, the fiery writings of the abolitionists, and so much more forgotten American history.  (You’ve just got to read the awesome biography of William Monroe Trotter, one of the bravest Americans ever {and of so many more amazing, yet mostly forgotten, black Americans}.)

So to all those who say, “We don’t need black history; let’s just have American history,” I say, that’s a great idea.  If you really mean it, then personally read the works I mentioned in the last paragraph and then begin to speak out to have them and the details of the African American experience taught and included in all American history textbooks.

Advertisements

About Steve Simms

I like to look and think outside the box. In college I encountered Jesus Christ and I have been passionate about trying to get to know Him better ever since. My wife and I co-lead a non-traditional expression of the body of Christ in Nashville based on open participation and Spirit-led sharing. We long to see the power and passion of the first Christ-followers come to life in our time. I have written a book about our experiences called, "Beyond Church: An Invitation To Experience The Lost Word Of The Bible--Ekklesia" that is available in Kindle & paperback @ http://amzn.to/2nCr5dP
This entry was posted in black history, history, lifestyles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Accepting Black History Into American History

  1. Pingback: Where Did Sojourner Truth Get Her Name? | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  2. Pingback: Frederick Douglas — Freedom Fighter | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  3. Pingback: Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  4. Pingback: My #VIII Greatest American Of All Time | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  5. Pingback: When Freedom Broke Out — My 7th Greatest American | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  6. Pingback: My Second Greatest American — Martin Luther King, Jr. | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  7. Pingback: Observations From Reading Quotation Books | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  8. Pingback: The First African American Medical Doctor | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  9. Pingback: Frog Legs & Prejudice | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  10. Pingback: Top Ten Greatest Americans #10 — Dorothy Day | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  11. Pingback: 12 Years A Slave — 12 Blogs On Slavery | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  12. Pingback: My Top Ten Blog Posts For Black History Month | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s