The Best, Least-Known Book In America — The Philokalia

You have probably never heard of the book that I consider to be the best, least-known book in America. It is very long — 5 volumes. It was written originally in Greek. A facebook group about this book has a total of only 40 members.

I first learned about this book when I read a book called The Way of a Pilgrim. It is the story of a man who wanders around Russia in the 19th Century reading and studying this book. At one point the pilgrim loses his copy and he sits down and weeps. Fortunately, it is returned to him a short time later.

When I read about the guy crying over the loss of his book, that made me want to find that book and read it. Several years later I was browsing in a Barnes & Noble and to my surprise, there was volume 1. I purchased it and began to read it. The Pilgrim was right. It is amazing.

I finished volume 1 and ordered volume 2. Then I bought and read volumes 3 and 4. I tried to order volume 5 for years, but never could locate it. Finally I discovered that it has never been translated into English.

I read all 4 volumes a second time.  Recently, I picked up volume 1 (after a few years) and began to read it for the third time. I couldn’t put it down.

This book describes the mental, emotional, and spiritual battles of being human. It gives practical, step-by-step instructions on how to deal with and overcome the issues that we all face everyday. My volumes are underlined and tattered.

The best, least-known book in America was edited by two Russian monks in the 17th Century. They pulled together the best writings that they could find on Mount Athos, a holy mountain in Greece that has been under the control of Eastern Orthodox monks for more than 1,000 years. The writings date from the 4th Century to the 17th Century.

The Greek name of the best, least-known book in America means “love of the beautiful.” It is called The Philokalia.

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About Steve Simms

I like to look and think outside the box. In college I encountered Jesus Christ and I have been passionate about trying to get to know Him better ever since. My wife and I co-lead a non-traditional expression of the body of Christ in Nashville based on open participation and Spirit-led sharing. We long to see the power and passion of the first Christ-followers come to life in our time. I have written a book about our experiences called, "Beyond Church: An Invitation To Experience The Lost Word Of The Bible--Ekklesia" that is available in Kindle & paperback @ http://amzn.to/2nCr5dP
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