Frog Legs & Prejudice

I don’t like frog legs. I won’t eat frog legs. I find frog legs totally disgusting. But the truth is, I’ve never given frog legs a chance.

I am so terribly offended with the idea of eating a slimy green wart-maker’s legs, that I just can’t put those lily pad jumpers in my mouth. (O, once or twice I have forced a nibble, but I think my taste buds were petrified. Anyway, I already knew I didn’t like it.)

The taste somehow doesn’t seem very important to me. Frog legs may taste like chicken, but I can’t taste the chicken for the toad.

I just don’t like frog legs! Okay. And I don’t like being pressured to give them a sincere try. I don’t like them because I don’t want to like them.

I guess I might be a little prejudiced. (“A little prejudiced!” you say.) Well, okay. I admit it. When you talk about eating toad toes, I’m jumping to conclusions. I’m like the guy who said: “I’ve got my mind made up, don’t confuse me with the facts.” When it comes to eating croaker crutches, I’m the guy who is so narrow minded that he can see through a key hole with both eyes at the same time.

Do you see my problem? I am so offended by frogs (I don’t even like tadpoles) that I refuse to give frog meat an honest try. I don’t know why I am so prejudiced against frog legs. However, if I thought my not eating frog legs was hurting people, I would make myself change. Prejudice is strong, but I could overcome it if I really wanted to.

In the world today, however, there is a far more dangerous prejudice that needs to be avoided and overcome. Prejudice against people’s skin color still exists. We still classify people by “race.”

In reality, however, people are just people. There is not “an us and a them.” There is just “a me and a you.” And you and I can get along if we get to know each other as individual people instead of as human categories.

We can disagree with people’s attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors, but their skin color? How can we disagree with someone’s complexion? “Red and yellow, black and white; they are precious in His sight.” Anything that obscures that fact is no laughing matter.

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About Steve Simms

I like to look and think outside the box. In college I encountered Jesus Christ and I have been passionate about trying to get to know Him better ever since. My wife and I co-lead a non-traditional expression of the body of Christ in Nashville based on open participation and Spirit-led sharing. We long to see the power and passion of the first Christ-followers come to life in our time. I have written a book about our experiences called, "Beyond Church: An Invitation To Experience The Lost Word Of The Bible--Ekklesia" that is available in Kindle & paperback @ http://amzn.to/2nCr5dP
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4 Responses to Frog Legs & Prejudice

  1. De says:

    Great article.

  2. Pingback: It’s Not Hard To Have Fun | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (Steve Simms Blogs From Nashville)

  3. Pingback: Top 10 Reasons 2 Read The Blog “Free Gas For Your Think Tank” | Free Gas For Your Think Tank (A blog to jog your mind and unclog your heart . . .)

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